How does the PRICE work?

This tour gives you access to the car privately.
You decide the number of participants.
The car is at your complete disposal for the 90 minutes.
You can be up to 8 people.
The price is based on the time of the day you choose to reserve your tour.


Price based on the time of the day

06:15pm to 7:45pm € 129 [this tour gives you chance to witness the Gregorian Chants]
08:15pm to 9:45pm € 129
Other times REQUEST PRICE VIA EMAIL HERE

What is included and what isn't ???

Please read carefully the following two lists. It will be easy to understand what the tour includes and what it doesn't. Anything not specifically mentioned here is not included. In case you have any questions send us an email and we will be happy to clarify the matter for you.

Included in this tour

Free WiFi on-board
Private tour ensures personal service
Transportation in air-conditioned Mercedes coach
All taxes - fuel surcharges - parking fees and tolls - service fees
A local English speaking driver/escort in suit with an excellent knowledge of the local area
Bottled water
Bottle of Prosecco wine - which is always a good start especially if you don't have to drive :)
Mini Ipad with Wi-Fi and mobile data connection so that you can use it in the car and outside as you walk around the city
10% VAT
Access to restricted traffic areas in all the towns
Price is for all of you

NOT INCLUDED in this tour

Gratuity

Tour Itinerary

6:15-8,15-10,15 pmDEPARTURE

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Your personal driver/guide will pick you up at your accomodation if located downtown, otherwise the meeting point is in front of Hard Rock Caffè, VIa Brunelleschi 1, Florence

9:00 amMICHELANGELO SQUARE AND THE SAN MINIATO AL MONTE CHURCH

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In the Piazzale Michelangelo we will stop the car and you can take pictures of the magnificent view and also have a drink of Prosecco white wine. At San Miniato al Monte Church, if possible, you will have a better view of Florence. Here the monks every evening at 6:30pm are singing their Gregorian chants.

90 Minutes laterBACK DOWNTOWN

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Your personal driver/guide will drop you off at your accomodation or restaurant if located downtown, otherwise drop off is in front of Hard Rock Caffè, VIa Brunelleschi 1, Florence.....

Here is a brief description of the tour

Private Tour - The most romantic way of watching the sun go to sleep in Florence, listen to the monks of the San Miniato church singing or discover the beauty of Florence at night with a special ride.
A 90 minutes tour in the streets of Florence with a stop in the Piazzale Michelangelo for a complimentary drink. It includes a bottle of wine and an audio commentary to learn about the city of Florence. Your private tour for 90 minutes, 8 people max in a Mercedes Luxury Sedan or Van with the most comfortable and high tech optionals. Discover the beauty of Florence at night with a special ride!


TOUR TIMES AND STOPS
Your private tour 8 people max. In the car you have a complimentary bottle of Prosecco White wine. It lasts 90 minutes and departs every 2 hours starting at 06:15pm. Your private driver/guide will pick you up at your accomodation if located downtown, otherwise the meeting point is in front of Hard Rock Caffè, VIa Brunelleschi 1, Florence. From the meeting point we drive to the magnificent Ponte alla Carraia which links the two souls of Florence: the romantic and historical centre to the bohemian and funky Oltrarno. A quick stop for a picture of the famous Parrocchia di San Frediano in Cestello at night. What a view! Then, we proceed to the Porta Romana Square. A rare chance to see on the forecourt, now at the center of a roundabout, a large marble statue contemporary of Michelangelo Pistoletto, called “dietrofront”. It depicts a woman who goes to the south, while the head rests on a long and extremely heavy burden projecting that indicates the opposite direction, toward the interior of the city.

THE SAN MINIATO CHURCH
Here the monks every evening at 6:30pm are singing their Gregorian chants. St. Miniato or Minas (Armenian: ?????) was an Armenian prince serving in the Roman army under Emperor Decius. He was denounced as a Christian after becoming a hermit and was brought before the Emperor who was camped outside the gates of Florence. The Emperor ordered him to be thrown to beasts in the Amphitheatre where a panther was called upon him but refused to devour him. Beheaded in the presence of the Emperor, he is alleged to have picked up his head, crossed the Arno and walked up the hill of Mons Fiorentinus to his hermitage. A shrine was later erected at this spot and there was a chapel there by the 8th century. Construction of the present church was begun in 1013 by Bishop Alibrando and it was endowed by the Emperor Henry II. The adjoining monastery began as a Benedictine community, then passed to the Cluniacs and then in 1373 to the Olivetans, who still run it. The monks make famous liqueurs, honey and tisanes, which they sell from a shop next to the church.
The interior exhibits the early feature of a choir raised on a platform above the large crypt. It has changed little since it was first built. The patterned pavement dates from 1207. The centre of the nave is dominated by the beautiful freestanding Cappella del Crocefisso (Chapel of the Crucifix), designed by Michelozzo in 1448. It originally housed the miraculous crucifix now in Santa Trìnita and is decorated with panels long thought to be painted by Agnolo Gaddi. The terracotta decoration of the vault is by Luca della Robbia. The mosaic of Christ between the Virgin and St Minias was made in 1260. The crypt is the oldest part of the church and the high altar supposedly contains the bones of St Minias himself (although there is evidence that these were removed to Metz before the church was even built). In the vaults are frescoes by Taddeo Gaddi. The raised choir and presbytery contain a magnificent Romanesque pulpit and screen made in 1207. The apse is dominated by a great mosaic dating from 1297, which depicts the same subject as that on the façade and is probably by the same unknown artist. The crucifix above the high altar is attributed to Luca della Robbia. The sacristy is decorated with a great fresco cycle on the Life of St Benedict by Spinello Aretino (1387). Cardinal of Portugal Chapel The Cappella del Cardinale del Portogallo to the left of the nave, “one of the most magnificent funerary monuments of the Italian Renaissance”, was built in 1473 as a memorial to Cardinal James of Lusitania, who died in Florence, to which he was Portuguese ambassador, in 1459. His is the only tomb in the church. The chapel is a collaboration of outstanding artists of Florence: it was designed by Brunelleschi’s associate, Antonio Manetti, and finished after his death by Giovanni Rossellino. The tomb was made by Antonio and Bernardo Rossellino. The chapel decoration is by Alesso Baldovinetti, Antonio and Piero del Pollaiuolo, and Luca della Robbia…

THE PIAZZALE MICHELANGELO
In the Piazzale Michelangelo we will stop the car and you can take pictures of the magnificent view and also have a drink of Prosecco white wine. Piazzale Michelangelo (Michelangelo Square) is a famous square with a magnificent panoramic view of Florence, Italy, and is a popular tourist destination in the Oltrarno district of the city. The famous view from this observation point overlooking the city has been reproduced on countless postcards and snapshots over the years.
It was built in 1869 and designed by architect Giuseppe Poggi on a hill just south of the historic center, during the redevelopment of the left bank of the Arno (the South side of the river). At that time, Florence was the capital of Italy and the whole city was involved in an urban renewal, the so-called “Risanamento” or the “Rebirth” of the city’s middle class. Lungarni (riverside walkways; “lungarno”, singular) were built on the riversides. On the right bank, the fourteenth-century walls were removed and turned into the Viali di Circonvallazione referencing the French “boulevard” design, six lanes wide and lined with trees. On the left bank winding up the hill of San Miniato the Viale dei Colli was built, a tree-lined street over 8 kilometers long ending at the Piazzale Michelangelo which was built as a terrace with a panoramic view of the city. The news of the rapid construction of this undertaking has been described in detail by the Italian journalist Peter Ferrigno (known under the name of Yorick).
The square, dedicated to the great Renaissance sculptor Michelangelo, has copies of some of his works found elsewhere in Florence: the David and the four allegories of the Medici Chapel of San Lorenzo. These copies are made of bronze, while the originals are all in white marble. The monument was brought up by nine pairs of oxen on 25 June 1873.
Poggi designed the loggia in the neoclassical style that dominates the whole terrace, which today houses a panoramic restaurant. Originally it was supposed to house a museum of works by Michelangelo, never realized. In the wall of the balcony, under the loggia, there is an epigraph in capital letters referring to his work: The Florentine architect Giuseppe Poggi turned this into his monument in MCMXI.
The panorama embraces the heart of Florence from Forte Belvedere to Santa Croce, across the lungarni and the bridges crossing the Arno, including the Ponte Vecchio, the Duomo, Palazzo Vecchio, the Bargello and the octagonal bell tower of the Badia Fiorentina. Beyond the view of the city itself are the hills of Settignano and Fiesole.
The Piazzale Michelangelo can be accessed by car along the tree-lined Viale Michelangelo, constructed at the same time, or by walking the stairs or going up the ramps from the Piazza Giuseppe Poggi, also known as the “Poggi Ramps” in the district of San Niccolò. Your personal driver/guide will drop you off at your accomodation or restaurant if located downtown, otherwise drop off is in front of Hard Rock Caffè, VIa Brunelleschi 1, Florence....